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3 Steps To Start An Effective Daily Routine

If you’re like most people, you probably have considered starting a new daily routine to optimize one or more aspects of your life. In a world where time has become more and more valuable, distractions are at an all time high, and to-do lists are as long as ever – people are looking for ways to better themselves. One of the most common ways that folks use to make a change is by adopting a new daily routine.

Routines are actions or a combination of actions that yield a specific outcome or result. They are the surest way to make an impactful change in our lives.

Sounds great, right? But where do you start? Here are 3 key steps to consider if you want to start an effective daily routine!

Step 1: Keep the end result in mind.

As humans we have hundreds of little routines we practice each day. Most of these we don’t care to or need to focus on, they simply happen. Adopting a new routine is usually in pursuit of something new that we wish to attain. The benefit of successfully completing the routines could improve us physically, mentally, or emotionally.

Some common results people shoot for with their routine include:

  • Decreased stress
  • Increased energy
  • Better sleep
  • Improved mental clarity
  • More time
  • Better performance at school/work/sport

Routines to achieve these outcomes might look like:

  • Take 10 deep breaths before beginning a new project at work.
  • Exercise at least three times each week.
  • Turn my phone to airplane mode 1 hour before bed.
  • Make a list dividing each job into its constituent parts.
  • Plan out my daily schedule every morning while I drink my coffee.
  • Visualize what a successful outcome would look like for my upcoming event.

Routines are most effective when practiced daily. Sometimes we need to focus extra hard on following through with a new routine until it becomes a habit. This is an important factor to consider in both the selection and implementation of your new daily routine.

BJ Fogg Behavior Model for effective daily routineDr. BJ Fogg, a behavioral scientist from Stanford, has a basic behavioral model he uses to describe the steps to change. He claims that in order for a behavior change to happen you need to have the right mix of motivation, ability, and a trigger.

If we are highly motivated to complete a task then the odds are that when a trigger occurs we will produce a successful outcome. Likewise we tend to be successful at tasks that are easy to complete even if we are not so motivated to get them done.

Makes sense, right? The challenge many of us face is that we fail to set up routines that take into account the motivation required to complete a task requiring a higher level of ability. We shoot for the stars and quickly burn out after our initial gusto wears off.

Does this mean that we shouldn’t aim to make big dramatic change with our new routine? Well…YES.

At least Dr. Fogg would advise against it. Instead he suggest focusing on the smallest possible change available to you in your new routine. Consistency wins the long term change game so you should pick a routine that you know you you can complete every single try. This will generate momentum and a new skill that you can apply later to more challenging target areas.

Action Step: Get out a pen and paper and spend 5 minutes brainstorming some ideas of areas you would like to implement a routine. Think about the end result you would like to achieve and make note of the top 2 or 3 new routines that would be a first step on the path to a solid daily routine.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

Step 2: Determine the lay of the land

This is a chance to take inventory of your assets and keep an eye out for potential pitfalls. Implementing a new behavior is challenging because it requires knocking our brain off of autopilot. Rather than coast through our day following the usual agenda we are throwing a strategic interruption to our thought pattern that lets us try something new. This step can be split into two categories:

Supporting Factors, things that can help you implement your routine. Some examples could be:

  • A supportive partner or best friend
  • A commute to work that offers some alone time
  • Sticky note reminders you place all over your house
  • A trainer, coach, or mentor who wants you to succeed

And Distracting Factors, barriers, or common faults that would get in the way of you completing your daily routine. This might look like:

  • Social settings where you may feel awkward practicing your new routine.
  • People who interrupt you and take up your time (EVEN IF YOU YOU LOVE THEM)
  • Physical struggles with things like exercise or waking up early.
  • Bad influences on your diet, behaviors, or actions.

Action Step: List the top 3 assets you have that could help you start your routine and then the top 3 distractions that may keep you from succeeding. For the distractions, find a solution for how you could overcome it (eg. Coordinate workout schedules with a friend, sign up for a class the night before, or prep healthy lunches for the week on Sunday afternoon).

 

Step 3: Track Your Progress

Benjamin Franklin, perhaps the founding father of using routines for personal development knew the importance of tracking and measuring his daily practices. Each morning Franklin asked himself, “What good shall I do today? And in the evening, “What good did I do today?” Taking the time twice each day to check in on his progress created more opportunities for growth and self-improvement.

Not only that but Ben cycled through a list of 13 virtues he chose to improve his morality. He would focus on one for a week at a time and document any infractions to the redeeming quality. He noticed significant improvement in his adherence cycling through each virtue four times a year.

As you prepare to start your new routine you want to keep track of your progress. Having clear defined parameters will make you more likely to succeed and recreate the process again for future habits.

Action Step: Make a plan to track your progress. What is the the key aspect of the routine are you measuring. What time of day will you log your results? Are you writing it in a notebook or on your phone or laptop? What will you write on days when you forget to adhere to your routine?

 

“We don’t rise to the level of our expectations, we fall to the level of our training.”Archilochos

So now that you have the 3 key steps to starting an effective daily routine, where do you go from here? Ask us how we can help fit exercise and fitness into your new action plan to be a better you!

4 Rules For Easy Weight Loss

4 Rules For Easy Weight Loss

Almost EVERYONE wants to lose weight and feel physically better. Unfortunately, the majority of us don’t know how or where to start.  We’ve been told that it’s too hard, takes too long, or worse, have been judged as being “on a diet” for way too long!! If you’re looking for your “silver bullet” to kickstart weight loss, here are 4 easy to follow rules that will melt the fat away:

Rule #1: Avoid “White” Carbohydrates

Avoid any carbohydrate that is, or can be, white.  This would include all bread, rice (including brown), cereal, potatoes, pasta, tortillas, and fried food with breading.  If you avoid eating these listed foods and anything else white you will be safe. Consume your starchier carbs (ex: sweet potato, yam) around your training times. Almost all restaurants can give you a salad or vegetables in place of french fries, potatoes or rice.

Rule #2: Don’t Drink Your Calories

Drink half your bodyweight in ounces of water a day and as much unsweetened tea and coffee as you like.  DO NOT drink milk, soft drinks, fruit juice or any sugary beverage. This includes alcohol. To make this even easier – aim to drink 1 gallon of water a day.

Rule #3: Don’t Overeat Fruit

We don’t need fruit six days a week.  The only exceptions to the fruit rule are tomatoes and avocados.  Fruit contains fructose, which is converted to glycerol phosphate more efficiently than any other carbohydrate. Glycerol phosphate turns into triglycerides via the liver, and turns into stored fat. If you think you can’t go 6 days without fruit, then try to go 5 days.

Rule #4: Eat The Same Few Meals Consistently

Keep it simple. Do yourself a favor and don’t try to reinvent menu planning every time you want to eat.  Find something you like that fits the parameters listed above and make it a staple in your day/week/month..  It’s ok to pick three or four meals and repeat them. If you’ve found a breakfast you like, eat it every morning.  This will also make meal prepping much easier and save you time.

Here’s the best part – if you ever feel you need more guidance or want to step it up a notch, our coaches are here to guide you. You have a support system every step of the way on your weight loss journey!

Interested in learning more keys to weight loss? Click here to talk with us today!

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